God’s Grace

BY THE GRACE OF GOD

Grace is God seeing you, beyond your mistakes. Grace is forgetting your past, to forge your future. Grace is God not only withholding the punishment we deserve, but giving us the victory we do not deserve. Grace is freedom beyond human effort. Grace is found only in the arms of our loving Father.

Before we knew Him, we were enemies of God.

“Once you were alienated from God and were enemies in your minds because of your evil behavior. But now he has reconciled you by Christ’s physical body through death to present you holy in his sight, without blemish and free from accusation— if you continue in your faith, established and firm, and do not move from the hope held out in the gospel.”

Colossians 1:21-23

But now? Well, this is what Jesus says about us now.

“You are my friends if you do what I command. I no longer call you servants, because a servant does not know his master’s business. Instead, I have called you friends, for everything that I learned from my Father I have made known to you.”

John 15:14-15

From enemies to friends. That’s what grace does. It welcomes and transforms. It’s Jesus touching the leper. It’s Jesus protecting the adulterous women. It’s Jesus cooking breakfast for the disciples who abandoned Him. In short – it’s Jesus. We are able to offer mercy, grace and forgiveness because that is precisely what we have received. It is grace that allows us to participate in His victory although we didn’t participate in His suffering.

Christians often define grace as “unmerited favour,” which is true. It’s God doing for us, on the cross of Christ, what we could not do for ourselves. From our sinful position, we have no influence over God, and He is under no obligation to come to our rescue. Yet He does – now and forever.

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith—and this is not from yourselves, it is the gift of God—not by works, so that no one can boast. For we are God’s handiwork, created in Christ Jesus to do good works, which God prepared in advance for us to do.”

Ephesians 2:8-10

“For the law was given through Moses; grace and truth came through Jesus Christ.”

John 1:17

“Therefore, since we have a great high priest who has ascended into heaven, Jesus the Son of God, let us hold firmly to the faith we profess. For we do not have a high priest who is unable to empathize with our weaknesses, but we have one who has been tempted in every way, just as we are—yet he did not sin. Let us then approach God’s throne of grace with confidence, so that we may receive mercy and find grace to help us in our time of need.”

Hebrews 4:14-16

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Pray With Purity

 

Pray with purity.

The heart is a mystery. Jeremiah 17:9 says it is deceptive above all things.  Proverbs 4:23 tells us to guard it, for everything we do flows from it. We may not think so, but sometimes we may have a wrong agenda when we pray for others. We shouldn’t pray that others become the person we want them to be, so they’re easier to deal with, or fit our criteria of holiness, but who He wants them to be. He works differently in every heart and although we may not see immediate fruit or repentance in others, we can’t judge others growth by our timetable or results. We see only others’ actions or hear their words, but God knows the depth of their heart and true motivations. They are not to be remade in our image. They are already made in His. Our prayers and love will bring that truth to the fore.

Psalm 51:10 asks the Father, “Create in me a pure heart, O God, and renew a steadfast spirit within me.” Psalm 139:23-24 has a similar request. It says, “Search me, God, and know my heart; test me and know my anxious thoughts. See if there is any offensive way in me, and lead me in the way everlasting.” We don’t always know our sins, or true motivations.

Just because we’re praying, we may think that we are more holy than those who rarely pray, but the Word teaches us to always examine our heart. What are our true motivations when we pray what we pray for? Yes, it’s good to pray for our ministries, but are we praying to be successful in the world’s eyes, or praying to be more recognised, or praying to have a “better” ministry than others in our church? If we are not closely communing with our God, our prayers will reflect our limited view. In John 15:7, Jesus says, “If you remain in me and my words remain in you, ask whatever you wish, and it will be done for you.” When Jesus says, “if,” we need to pay attention, because He is paying attention to the state of our heart when we approach Him. We can not hide our motivations from His sight. When Jesus taught us to pray in Matthew 6, the first few words are all about His name, His kingdom, and His will. We must first humble ourselves in His presence and be sensitive to the Spirit. Be flexible, and pray for God’s agenda, not ours.

We must recognise too, that our prayers will not always be the same. They shouldn’t. Sometimes we may cry and intercede, at other times we may be silent and listen, or dance with joy at His glory, or repent and seek to know Him more intimately. Just like every conversation and interaction within our friends is not always the same, neither should our prayers be. Intimate friendships aren’t built on repetition. They are thriving, living conversations. They are valuable and varied. They key is to come before Him in humility.

We must first listen and then pray according to His will. Your friend may desperately need a better job, because their current one is filled with strength and challenging colleagues, so do you ask God for a new, stress-free job for them, or do you ask Him to strengthen them to be a good witness in their workplace? Firstly, we must seek His will, and then we pray in accordance with that. We can’t give God advice when we pray. God sees what we don’t. Trust that His will be done, regardless of the situation.

Yes, God wants what’s best for us, but what we consider to be the best is often based on temporary conditions. Max Lucado once said, “If God has to choose between your eternal safety, or earthly comfort, which do you hope He chooses?” Remember, God is far more interested in your growth than your comfort. Look at every great person we know of in the Bible; Paul, Daniel, Job, Esther, Jesus, and so many others. They were rarely comfortable, but they were powerful, because they clung to God during their pain and suffering. He led them through it, and made them better for it. They learned to rely on the eternal God regardless of temporary circumstances. God will do what is necessary to achieve our ultimate salvation, simply due to the fact that He loves us that much. He wants to spend eternity with us. Yes, we will suffer but that’s not all we will do. If we humble ourselves and allow His plan to come to fruition, we will be refined, transformed and become even better vessels for His glory.  Pray in line with God’s perspective, and ask Him to forgive and change us if we pray, even subtly, that our will instead of His be done, for salvation is much more valuable than satisfaction.

“But who can discern their own errors? Forgive my hidden faults. Keep your servant also from willful sins; may they not rule over me.
Then I will be blameless, innocent of great transgression. May these words of my mouth and this meditation of my heart be pleasing in your sight,
Lord, my Rock and my Redeemer.”

Psalm 19:12-14

“Dear friends, if our hearts do not condemn us, we have confidence before God and receive from him anything we ask, because we keep his commands and do what pleases him. And this is his command: to believe in the name of his Son, Jesus Christ, and to love one another as he commanded us.”

1 John 3:2

Praise Be

Praise Be

Psalm 56:8 says this – “Record my misery; list my tears on your scroll — are they not in your record?”

Other translations call it a book, or a bottle. It’s a startingly powerful reminder of God’s love for us. He sees the tears that flow from our suffering, our sorrow, our shame. He sees what we hide from others. And you know what? He records it, but for what purpose? Because He sees, and He cares. We are not forgotten.

John 3:16 is the most famous verse in the Bible. Even people who don’t believe it, know it – “For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.” How many of us know the verse after that though?

“For God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but to save the world through him.” John 3:17 is integral in the way that it connects to John 3:16. Verse 16 tells us that Christ died so that we shall “have eternal life.” Verse 17 tells us why, because it begins with “For.” There’s always a reason why God does what He does. Christ died to give us eternity, because He came to save, not condemn.

Verse 16 and 17 tell us what Christ came to do, and what He came not to do. He came to save you. He did not come to condemn you. Have you ever been in heated argument with someone and they bring up all your past mistakes? They do that to remind you of the fact that they think your previous actions are much worse than theirs. They may not be relevant to the discussion at hand, but they use it as ammunition from a place of insecurity to condemn you and make you feel worse than they feel. They seem to remember all your sins and errors with alarming clarity, but struggle to recall the positive aspects of your character and the times of sacrifice and selfless love. Thankfully God does not treat us like that. He looks at us through the blood and righteousness of Christ’s sacrifice. He views us with the hopeful gaze of a Father. He sees who we are becoming and doesn’t condemn us for who we used to be.

Psalm 103:11-12 declares, “For as high as the heavens are above the earth, so great is his love for those who fear him; as far as the east is from the west, so far has he removed our transgressions from us.”

I once heard a preacher say that the reason God chose to use the phrase, “as far as the east is from the west,” to describe the distance between our sins and how far God has removed them from us is because east and west can not be measured. There is a North Pole, and a South Pole, but there is no distinct location for east and west.

Don’t grab a compass and go looking for your past transgressions. They are forgiven. They are forgotten. They are erased, and they’re not coming back. You won’t find God’s voice if you go looking for your sins. You’ll find it when you let go of all the condemnation and fear and injustice and you accept the fact that God accepts you. You are His son. His daughter. His vessel. His beloved. 2 Corinthians 5:17 declares that you are a new creation. “The old has gone, the new has come!” I love the fact that Paul uses an exclamation mark, to emphasise the point with joyful victory. Your old self is gone! You’re made new! Don’t reflect on your old self. God doesn’t. Don’t remind yourself of how bad you used to be, twenty years ago, or twenty seconds ago, unless it’s to praise God for how much His loving forgiveness has transformed you. Don’t do the devil’s work for him. Forget the past. That’s not you anymore.

1 John 3:8 says that the reason Christ came was “to destroy the devil’s work.” Satan’s work is condemnation. Christ destroys the voice that reminds you of your wickedness and sins. Christ’s voice speaks forgiveness, and He left us a perfect example to follow. We must not condemn ourselves, but forgive ourselves as well as others. We must speak to ourselves, and others, the complete freedom and acceptance that God speaks over us.

“If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just and will forgive us our sins and purify us from all unrighteousness.”

1 John 1:9

“The Lord is compassionate and gracious, slow to anger, abounding in love. He will not always accuse, nor will he harbor his anger forever; he does not treat us as our sins deserve
or repay us according to our iniquities. For as high as the heavens are above the earth,
so great is his love for those who fear him; as far as the east is from the west,
so far has he removed our transgressions from us.”

Psalm 103:8-12